Pacific Pictures

Pacific-Pictures.com

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About Pacific-Pictures.com

Moon South Pacific travel guidesPacific-Pictures.com is a collection of travel photos taken by David Stanley while researching all eight editions of Moon Handbooks South Pacific. A few of Stanley's photographs originally appeared in his guides, while the rest are published here for the first time.

Stanley first visited the South Pacific in 1978, and over the next quarter century he produced travel guidebooks to Fiji, Tahiti, Tonga, Samoa, Micronesia, and the South Pacific as a whole.

This website tries to present a cross section of the Pacific, with the emphasis on "real island life" rather than the artificial world of tourism. Hopefully these images convey to you some of the atmosphere of a unique region, and the friendly people who call the Pacific home.

Pacific-Pictures.com was designed by M.E. de Vos, whose portfolio includes Cuba-Pictures.com and MapSouthPacific.com among others.

The photo galleries are arranged by country and territory, although Micronesia is actually a vast region comprised of seven separate entities. Have a look at our Pacific map to see where all the pictures fit in.

About David Stanley

David Stanley has been writing travel guidebooks since 1979. His guides to the South Pacific islands and Micronesia opened Oceania to independent travelers for the first time.

Stanley also researched and wrote the first three editions of Eastern Europe on a Shoestring, Lonely Planet's first guide to Europe. Subsequently he covered Cuba and parts of Canada for the same company.

To learn about his latest books, visit  South Pacific Travel or check out his travel blog.

Tips for Taking Better Pictures  
  • Keep your photos simple, with one main subject and an uncomplicated background.
  • Get as close to your subjects as you can, and lower or raise the camera to their level.
  • Include people in the foreground of scenic shots to add interest and perspective.
  • Outdoors, a flash can fill in unflattering facial shadows caused by high sun or backlit conditions.
  • Most of all, be creative. Look for interesting details, and compose the photo before you push the trigger.
  • Instead of taking a head-on photo of a group of people, step to one side and ask them to face you. The angle improves the photo. Photograph subjects coming toward you rather than passing by.

---from Moon Handbooks South Pacific by David Stanley  

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